2015 Vol.27(1)

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Preface
Cancer statistics: updated cancer burden in China
Wanqing Chen
2015, 27(1): 1-1. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.02.07
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Original Article
Annual report on status of cancer in China, 2011
Wanqing Chen, Rongshou Zheng, Hongmei Zeng, Siwei Zhang, Jie He
2015, 27(1): 2-12. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.01.06
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ObjectiveThe National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) collected population-based cancer registration data in 2011 from all cancer registries. National cancer incidence and mortality were compiled and cancer incident new cases and cancer deaths were estimated.MethodsIn 2014, there were 234 cancer registries submitted cancer incidence and deaths occurred in 2011. All datasets were checked and evaluated based on the criteria of data quality from NCCR. Total 177 registries’ data were qualified and compiled for cancer statistics in 2011. The pooled data were stratified by area (urban/rural), gender, age group (0, 1-4, 5-9, 10-14…85+) and cancer type. Cancer incident cases and deaths were estimated using age-specific rates and national population in 2011. All incidence and death rates are age-standardized to the 2000 Chinese standard population and Segi’s population expressed per 100,000 persons.ResultsAll 177 cancer registries (77 in urban and 100 in rural areas) covered 175,310,169 populations (98,341,507 in urban and 76,968,662 in rural areas). The morphology verified cases (MV%) accounting for 70.14% and 2.44% of incident cases were identified through death certifications only (DCO%) with mortality to incidence ratio of 0.63. The estimates of new cancer incident cases and cancer deaths were 3,372,175 and 2,113,048 in 2011, respectively. The incidence rate was 250.28/100,000 (males 277.77/100,000, females 221.37/100,000), and the age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) were 186.34/100,000 and 182.76/100,000 with the cumulative incidence rate (0-74 years old) of 21.20%. The cancer incidence and ASIRC in urban areas were 261.38/100,000 and 189.89/100,000 compared to 238.60/100,000 and 182.10/100,000 in rural areas, respectively. The cancer mortality was 156.83/100,000 (194.88/100,000 in males and 116.81/100,000 in females), the age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world standard population (ASMRW) were 112.88/100,000 and 111.82/100,000, and the cumulative mortality rate (0-74 years old) was 12.69%. The cancer mortality and ASMRC were 154.37/100,000 and 108.20/100,000 in urban areas, and 159.42/100,000 and 117.97/100,000 in rural areas, respectively. Cancers of lung, female breast, stomach, liver, colon and rectum, esophageal, cervix, uterus, prostate and ovary were the most common cancers, accounting for about 75% of all cancer new cases. Lung cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, female breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, brain tumor, cervical cancer and leukemia were the leading causes of cancer death, accounting for about 80% of all cancer deaths. The cancer incidence, mortality and spectrum showed difference between urban and rural areas, males and females.ConclusionsThe coverage of cancer registration population had a greater increase than that in the last year. The data quality and representativeness are gradually improved. As the basic work of cancer prevention and control, cancer registry is playing an irreplaceable role. The disease burden of cancer is increasing, and the health department has to take effective measures to contain the increased cancer burden in China.
Population-based cancer incidence analysis in Beijing, 2008-2012
Lei Yang, Yannan Yuan, Tingting Sun, Huichao Li, Ning Wang
2015, 27(1): 13-21. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.01.07
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ObjectiveTo analyze the incidence of cancer during 2008-2012 in Beijing, China, and compare the cancer spectrum with that during 1998-1999.MethodsData from the Beijing Cancer Registry (BCR), which covered 12 million residents and 16 administrative regions in Beijing, were checked and evaluated on basis of the criteria of data quality from the National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) of China. Incidences were calculated stratified by cancer type, sex, areas (urban/rural), and age. The Chinese census population in 1982 and the world Segi’s population were used for calculating the age-standardized incidences.ResultsA total of 177,101 new cancer cases were diagnosed in Beijing between 2008 and 2012. The crude incidence rate (CR) of all cancers was 282.64/100,000 (290.71/100,000 in males and 274.45/100,000 in females). The age-standardized rates by Chinese standard population (ASR-China) and by world standard population (ASR-world) were 124.46/100,000 and 161.18/100,000, respectively. Female breast cancer was the most common cancer, followed by lung cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, and stomach cancer, with the CR of 59.87/100,000, 59.21/100,000, 32.49/100,000, 19.81/100,000 and 17.96/100,000, respectively. In urban areas, female breast cancer (68.50/100,000) was still the most common cancer, followed by lung cancer (61.23/100,000), colorectal cancer (37.23/100,000), prostate cancer (20.49/100,000) and stomach cancer (20.07/100,000). In rural areas, lung cancer (55.94/100,000) was the most common cancer, followed by female breast cancer (45.87/100,000), colorectal cancer (24.77/100,000), liver cancer (20.68/100,000) and stomach cancer (14.52/100,000). Great changes of the cancer spectrum were found from the period of 1998-1999 to the period of 2011-2012 in Beijing.ConclusionsThe cancer burden in Beijing was heavier than the national average level. Cancer prevention and control strategies, especially for lung, colorectal, prostate and female thyroid cancers, should be enhanced.
Incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in China, 2011
Shuzheng Liu, Rongshou Zheng, Meng Zhang, Siwei Zhang, Xibin Sun, Wanqing Chen
2015, 27(1): 22-28. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.02.01
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ObjectiveColorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. This article provides the most up-to-date overview of colorectal cancer burden in China.MethodsTotally 234 cancer registries submitted data of 2011 to the National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR). Qualified data from 177 registries was pooled and analyzed. The crude incidence and mortality rates of colorectal cancer were calculated by age, gender and geographic area. The numbers of new cases and deaths were estimated using the 5-year age-specific cancer incidence/mortality rates and the corresponding populations. China census in 2000 and Segi’s world population were applied for age standardized rates.ResultsThe estimate of new cases diagnosed with colorectal cancer of China in 2011 was 310,244 (178,404 for males and 131,840 for females, 195,117 in urban areas and 115,128 in rural areas), accounting for 9.20% of overall new cancer cases. The crude incidence of colorectal cancer ranked fourth in all cancer sites with rate of 23.03/100,000 (25.83/100,000 for males and 20.08/100,000 for female, 28.25/100,000 in urban areas and 17.54/100,000 in rural areas). The age-standardized rates by China population and by World population were 16.79/100,000 and 16.52/100,000, respectively. The estimated number of colorectal cancer deaths of China in 2011 was 149,722 (86,427 for males and 63,295 for females, 91,682 in urban areas and 58,040 in rural areas), accounting for 7.09% of overall cancer deaths. The crude mortality rate for colorectal cancer ranked fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in all cancer sites with rate of 11.11/100,000 (12.51/100,000 for males and 9.64/100,000 for female, 13.27/100,000 in urban areas and 8.84/100,000 in rural areas). The age-standardized rates by China population and by World population for mortality were 7.77/100,000 and 7.66/100,000, respectively. For both of incidence and mortality, the rates of colorectal cancer were much higher in males than in females, and in rural areas than in urban areas. The rate of colorectal cancer increased greatly with age, especially after 40 or 45 years old.ConclusionsColorectal cancer is a relative common cancer in China, especially for males in urban areas. Targeted prevention and early detection programs should be carried out.
Pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality patterns in China, 2011
Yutong He, Rongshou Zheng, Daojuan Li, Hongmei Zeng, Siwei Zhang, Wanqing Chen
2015, 27(1): 29-37. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.02.05
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ObjectiveThe National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) collected population-based cancer registration data in 2011 from all cancer registries in China. The incidence and mortality rates for pancreatic cancer were compiled and pancreatic cancer incident new cases and deaths were estimated.MethodsA total of 234 cancer registries submitted cancer data to NCCR. Data from 177 cancer registries were qualified and compiled for cancer statistics in 2011. Pancreatic cancer cases were extracted and analyzed from the national database. The pooled data were stratified by area (urban/rural), gender and age group (0, 1-4, 5-9, 10-14…85+). Pancreatic cancer incident cases and deaths were estimated using age-specific rates and national population in 2010. The national census in 2000 and Segi’s population were used for age-standardized rates.ResultsAll 177 cancer registries (77 in urban and 100 in rural areas) covered 175,310,169 populations (98,341,507 in urban and 76,968,662 in rural areas). The morphology verified pancreatic cancer cases (MV%) accounting for 40.52% and 4.33% of pancreatic cancer incident cases were identified through death certifications only (DCO%) with mortality to incidence ratio (M/I) of 0.91. The estimated number of newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer cases and deaths were 80,344 and 72,723 in 2011, respectively. The crude incidence rate was 5.96/100,000 (males 6.57/100,000, females 5.32/100,000). The age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) were 4.27/100,000 and 4.23/100,000 respectively, ranking 10th among all cancers. Pancreatic cancer incidence rate and ASIRC were 7.03/100,000 and 4.94/100,000 in urban areas whereas they were 4.84/100,000 and 3.56/100,000 in rural areas. The incidence rate of pancreatic cancer of 33 cancer registries increased from 3.24/100,000 in 2003 to 3.59/100,000 in 2011 with an annual percentage change (APC) of 1.44. The pancreatic cancer mortality rate was 5.40/100,000 (males 5.88/100,000, females 4.89/100,000), ranking 6th among all cancers. The age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world standard population (ASMRW) were 3.81/100 000 and 3.79/100 000. The pancreatic cancer mortality and ASMRC were 6.47/100,000 and 4.48/100,000 in urban areas, and 4.27/100,000 and 3.08/100,000 in rural areas, respectively. The mortality rates of pancreatic cancer showed an approximately 1.14-fold increase, from 2.85/100,000 in 2003 to 3.26/100,000 in 2011, with an APC of 1.68.ConclusionsThe burden of pancreatic cancer is increasing in China. Identification of high-risk population and adequate treatment and prevention are important.
Ovary cancer incidence and mortality in China, 2011
Kuangrong Wei, Yuanming Li, Rongshou Zheng, Siwei Zhang, Zhiheng Liang, Huishan Cen, Wanqing Chen
2015, 27(1): 38-43. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.01.05
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ObjectiveTo evaluate and analyze ovary cancer incidence and mortality in China in 2011 using ovary cancer data from population-based cancer registration in China, and to provide scientific information for its control and prevention.MethodsInvasive cases of ovary cancer were extracted and analyzed from the overall Chinese cancer database in 2011, which were based on data from 177 population-based cancer registries distributing in 28 provinces. The crude, standardized, and truncated incidences and mortalities et al. were calculated and new and deaths cases from ovary cancer throughout China and in different regions in 2011 were estimated using Chinese practical population.ResultsThe estimates of new ovary cancer cases and deaths were 45,223 and 18,430, respectively, in China in 2011. The crude incidence rate, age-standardized rate by Chinese standard population (ASR-C) and age-standardized rate by world standard population (ASR-W) incidence were 6.89/100,000, 5.35/100,000 and 5.08/100,000, respectively; the crude, ASR-C and ASR-W mortalities were 2.81/100,000, 2.01/100,000 and 1.99/100,000, respectively. The incidence and mortality in urban areas were higher than those in rural areas. The age-specific incidence and mortality increased rapidly from age 35-39 and peaked at age 60-64 or 75-79 years. After age 45 or 55, the age-specific incidence and death rates in urban were much higher than those in rural areas.ConclusionsCompared with GLOBOCAN 2012 data, the ovary cancer incidence in China in 2011 was at middle level, but its mortality was at low level worldwide.
Oral cancer incidence and mortality in China, 2011
Shao-Kai Zhang, Rongshou Zheng, Qiong Chen, Siwei Zhang, Xibin Sun, Wanqing Chen
2015, 27(1): 44-51. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.01.03
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ObjectiveTo descript the incidence and mortality rates of oral cancer among Chinese population in 2011, and provide valuable data for oral cancer prevention and research.MethodsData from 177 population-based cancer registries distributed in 28 provinces were accepted for this study after evaluation based on quality control criteria, covering a total of 175,310,169 populations and accounting for 13.01% of the overall national population in 2011. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated by area, gender and age groups. The numbers of new cases and deaths were estimated using the 5-year age-specific cancer incidence/mortality rates and the corresponding populations. The Chinese population in 2000 and World Segi’s population were used for age-standardized rates.ResultsThe estimate of new cases diagnosed with oral cancer was 39,450 including 26,160 males and 13,290 females. The overall crude incidence rate for oral cancer was 2.93/100,000. The age-standardized rates by China (ASRCN) population and by World population (ASRwld) were 2.22/100,000 and 2.17/100,000, respectively. Among subjects aged 0-74 years, the cumulative incidence rate was 0.25%. The estimated number of oral cancer deaths of China in 2011 was 16,933, including 11,794 males and 5,139 females. The overall crude mortality rate was 1.26/100,000, accounting for 0.80% of all cancer deaths. The ASRCN and ASRwld for mortality were 0.90/100,000 and 0.89/100,000, respectively. Among subjects aged 0-74 years, the cumulative mortality rate was 0.10%. The incidence and mortality rates of oral cancer were much higher in males and urban areas than in females and rural areas. In addition, the incidence and mortality rates were increased by the raising of ages.ConclusionsResults in the study may have important roles for oral cancer prevention and research. Although oral cancer burden of China is not high, we must pay attention to this malignancy as well. In addition, further researches need to be done for primary and secondary prevention research of oral cancer, especially for the high risk population.
Incidence and mortality of laryngeal cancer in China, 2011
Lingbin Du, Huizhang Li, Chen Zhu, Rongshou Zheng, Siwei Zhang, Wanqing Chen
2015, 27(1): 52-58. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.02.02
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ObjectiveLaryngeal cancer is the common cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract. We aimed to use the national cancer registration data in 2011 to estimate the incidence and mortality of laryngeal cancer within China.MethodsComparable, high-quality data from 177 population-based cancer registries were qualified for analysis. The pooled data were stratified by area, sex and age group. National new cases and deaths of laryngeal cancer were estimated using age-specific rates and national population in 2010. All incidence and death rates were age-standardized to the 2000 Chinese standard population and Segi’s population, which were expressed per 100,000 populations.ResultsAll 177 cancer registries covered a total of 175,310,169 population (98,341,507 in urban and 76,968,662 in rural areas), accounting for 13.01% of the national population. The data quality indicators of proportion of morphological verification (MV%), percentage of cancer cases identified with death certification only (DCO%) and mortality to incidence ratio (M/I) were 77.98%, 2.62% and 0.55, respectively. Estimated 20,875 new cases of laryngeal cancer were diagnosed and 11,488 deaths from laryngeal cancer occurred in China in 2011. The crude incidence rate of laryngeal cancer was 1.55/100,000 (2.69/100,000 in males and 0.35/100,000 in females). Age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) were 1.13/100,000 and 1.14/100,000, respectively. Laryngeal cancer is much rarer in females than in males. The incidence rate was higher in urban areas than that in rural areas. The crude mortality rate of laryngeal cancer was 0.85/100,000 (1.42/100,000 in males and 0.25/100,000 in females). Age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world standard population (ASMRW) were both 0.61/100,000. The mortality rate in males was much higher than that in females. There was no definite difference in mortality rates of laryngeal cancer between urban and rural areas.ConclusionsLarynx is a specialized area and cancer of larynx significantly affects the quality of life for the patients. Comprehensive measures should be carried out to prevent the ascent of laryngeal cancer.
Population attributable risks of cigarette smoking for deaths of all causes, all cancers and other chronic diseases among adults aged 40-74 years in urban Shanghai, China
Ying-Ying Wang, Wei Zhang, Hong-Lan Li, Jing Gao, Yu-Ting Tan, Yu-Tang Gao, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Zheng, Yong-Bing Xiang
2015, 27(1): 59-65. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.02.08
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ObjectiveTo evaluate the population attributable risks (PARs) between cigarette smoking and deaths of all causes, all cancers, lung cancer and other chronic diseases in urban Shanghai.MethodsIn total, 61,480 men aged 40-74 years from 2002 to 2006 and 74,941 women aged 40-70 years from 1997 to 2000 were recruited to undergo baseline surveys in urban Shanghai, with response rates of 74.0% and 92.3%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of deaths associated with cigarette smoking. PARs and 95% CIs for deaths were estimated from smoking exposure rates and the estimated RRs.ResultsCigarette smoking was responsible for 23.9% (95% CI: 19.4-28.3%) and 2.4% (95% CI: 1.6-3.2%) of all deaths in men and women, respectively, in our study population. Respiratory disease had the highest PAR in men [37.5% (95% CI: 21.5-51.6%)], followed by cancer [31.3% (95% CI: 24.6-37.7%)] and cardiovascular disease (CVD) [24.1% (95% CI: 16.7-31.2%)]. While the top three PARs were 12.7% (95% CI: 6.1-19.3%), 4.0% (95% CI: 2.4-5.6%), and 1.1% (95% CI: 0.0-2.3%), for respiratory disease, CVD, and cancer, respectively in women. For deaths of lung cancer, the PAR of smoking was 68.4% (95% CI: 58.2-76.5%) in men.ConclusionsIn urban Shanghai, 23.9% and 2.4% of all deaths in men and women could have been prevented if no people had smoked in the area. Effective control programs against cigarette smoking should be strongly advocated to reduce the increasing smoking-related death burden.
Preclinical characterization and validation of a dual-labeled trastuzumab-based imaging agent for diagnosing breast cancer
Xuejuan Wang, Melissa B. Aldrich, Milton V. Marshall, Eva M. Sevick-Muraca
2015, 27(1): 74-82. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.01.02
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ObjectiveThe combination of both nuclear and fluorescent reporters provides unique opportunities for noninvasive nuclear imaging with subsequent fluorescence image-guided resection and pathology. Our objective was to synthesize and optimize a dual-labeled trastuzumab-based imaging agent that can be used to validate an optical imaging agent with potential use in identifying tumor metastases in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer patients.Methods[111In]-DTPA-trastuzumab-IRDye 800 was synthesized by a three-step procedure. Purity, stability, immunoreactivity, internalization and biodistribution were explored in HER2+ SKBR-3 cells. Biodistribution of [111In]-DTPA-trastuzumab-IRDye 800 was performed in a SKBR-3 xenograft model.Results[111In]-DTPA-trastuzumab-IRDye 800 demonstrated high purity by both chemical and fluorometric determinations. Both flow cytometry and the Lindmo assay demonstrated a high binding affinity of [111In]-DTPA-trastuzumab-IRDye 800 to HER2-overexpressing cells. The dual-labeled conjugate was stable in PBS, but not in serum after 24 h at 37 °C. Larger molecules (>150 kD) were seen after a 24 h-incubation in human serum. Biodistribution studies revealed tumor-specific accumulation of [111In]-DTPA-trastuzumab-IRDye 800 in SKBR-3 tumors, and tumor uptakes at 24 and 48 h were (12.42±1.72)% and (9.96±1.05)%, respectively, following intravenous administration. The tumor-to-muscle ratio was 9.13±1.68 at 24 h, and increased to 12.79±2.13 at 48 h. Liver and kidney showed marked uptake of the dual-labeled imaging agent.Conclusions[111In]-DTPA-trastuzumab-IRDye 800 is an effective diagnostic biomarker that can be used to validate dual-labeled, molecularly targeted imaging agents and can allow these agents to be translated into clinical practice for identifying HER2+ lesions.
Evaluation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for diagnosis of dysplastic nodules with a focus of hepatocellular carcinoma in liver cirrhosis patients
Wei Wu, Minhua Chen, Kun Yan, Yin Dai, Shanshan Yin, Wei Yang, Zhihui Fan
2015, 27(1): 83-89. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.02.06
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ObjectiveTo compare the enhancement features of dysplastic nodules with a focus of hepatocellular carcinoma (DN-HCC) versus HCC and regenerative nodules (RN) in cirrhotic patients.MethodsOne hundred and ninety-three cirrhotic patients were enrolled in this study; they had 215 focal liver lesions, 1.0-3.5 cm in size, which were examined using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with SonoVue® and diagnosed as HCC, RN or DN-HCC by biopsy. Samples were obtained using 18-gauge needles in the different enhanced areas. The enhancement features of DN-HCC, HCC and RN were evaluated.ResultsThere were 86 HCC lesions, 102 RN lesions, and 27 DN-HCC lesions diagnosed by biopsy. Of 86 HCC lesions, 87.2% (75/86) showed complete enhancement during the arterial phase, and 12.8% (11/86) had inhomogeneous enhancement, with no enhancement in the central area during the arterial phase; 100% (86/86) exhibited washout during the late phase. Of 102 RN lesions, 95.1% (97/102) had delayed or simultaneous enhancement during the arterial phase, and 4.9% (5/102) displayed slight enhancement during the arterial phase; 26.5% (27/102) exhibited washout and 73.5% (75/102) exhibited no washout during the late phase. In 27 DN-HCC lesions, only part of the lesions enhanced during the arterial phase and washed out during the late phase; the other areas had delayed or simultaneous enhancement during the arterial phase, and 29.6% (8/27) exhibited slight washout in the late phase. In 86 HCCs, the pathological feature was HCC in the enhanced area of 75 lesions, hepatocellular fatty degeneration in the slightly enhanced area of 7 lesions, and hepatocellular necrosis in the unenhanced area and HCC in the enhanced area of 4 lesions. In 102 RNs, the pathological diagnosis was hepatocyte proliferation with or without fatty degeneration. In 27 DN-HCCs, the pathological feature was HCC in the enhanced area and hepatocyte regeneration in the unenhanced area.ConclusionsCEUS is useful for the diagnosis of focal liver lesions in cirrhotic patients. CEUS can help determine the progression from RN to DN-HCC to HCC by analyzing the hemodynamics. CEUS can promote the diagnostic accuracy of a biopsy by providing more accurate information on the site of the biopsy.
Editorial
Recent advances in uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery
Diego Gonzalez-Rivas
2015, 27(1): 90-93. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.02.03
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Thanks to the recent improvements in video-assisted thoracoscopic techniques (VATS) and anesthetic procedures, a great deal of complex lung resections can be performed avoiding open surgery. The experience gained through VATS techniques, enhancement of the surgical instruments, improvement of high definition cameras and avoidance of intubated general anesthesia have been the greatest advances to minimize the trauma to the patient. Uniportal VATS for major resections has become a revolution in the treatment of lung pathologies since initially described 4 years ago. The huge number of surgical videos posted on specialized websites, live surgery events and experimental courses has contributed to the rapid learning of uniportal major thoracoscopic surgery during the last years. The future of the thoracic surgery is based on evolution of surgical procedures and anesthetic techniques to try to reduce the trauma to the patient. Further development of new technologies probably will focus on sealing devices for all vessels and fissure, refined staplers and instruments, improvements in 3D systems or wireless cameras, and robotic surgery. As thoracoscopic techniques continue to evolve exponentially, we can see the emergence of new approaches in the anesthetical and the perioperative management of these patients. Advances in anesthesia include lobectomies performed without the employment of general anesthesia, through maintaining spontaneous ventilation, and with minimally sedated patients. Uniportal VATS resections under spontaneous ventilation probably represent the least invasive approach to operate lung cancer.
Letter to the Editor
Physical scientists research biomedicine: a call for caution
Yì-Xiáng J. Wáng
2015, 27(1): 94-95. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.1000-9604.2015.01.01
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